Repatriation Team 

Te Herekiekie Haerehuka Herewini

Kaiwhakahaere Kaupapa Pūtere Kōiwi – Manager Repatriation

Te Herekiekie Haerehuka Herewini is of Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Whakaue, Ngāti Apa, Ngā Rauru Kītahi, Whanganui, Ngā Puhi, and Ngāti Porou descent. He was raised in Ratana Pā before his whānau (family) moved to Wellington in the 1970s.

Te Herekiekie began his role as Kaiwhakahaere Kaupapa Pūtere Kōiwi / Manager Repatriation in October 2007, and since that time has focused on activities that include:

    • Strengthening the programme’s research capability and capacity;
    • Providing education materials that inform communities and institutions about the history, trade and collection of kōiwi tangata (Māori skeletal remains), kōimi tangata (Moriori skeletal remains) and Toi moko (preserved Māori tattooed heads); 
    • Actively re-uniting tūpuna (ancestors) returning from overseas institutions and also those housed at Te Papa with their hau kāinga (homeland) and to their whānau, hapū and iwi (communities of origin); and 
    • Consulting  with iwi about an approriate final resting place for unprovenanced kōiwi tangata, which are Māori remains where there is uncertainty about their iwi or regional provenance.   
    • In his capacity as manager Te Herekiekie has actively participated in a number of international repatriations of Māori and Moriori ancestral remains and also their unification with their iwi (tribe) and rohe (region) of origin.

Te Herekiekie has a Master of Arts (Honours) in Māori Studies from the University of Auckland.

 

 

 

Te Herekiekie Haerehuka Herewini
 

Amber Kiri Aranui

Pou Rangahau Rautaki Kōiwi – Repatriation Researcher

Amber is of Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Waikato, and Ngāi Tahu descent. She was born and raised in the HuttValley, Wellington.

With a strong background in New Zealand archaeology and anthropology, Amber joined the repatriation team in 2008. Her previous experience, knowledge and existing relationships with iwi (tribal groups) and hapū (sub-tribes) throughout the country has been an asset to the programmes research.

Amber's work with the Karanga Aotearoa to date includes:

  • Presenting in both national and international forums on her research as well as the history and current activities of the programme
  • Producing research about the history of the trade of Toi moko and kōiwi tangata
  • Participating in the active repatriation of tūpuna from international institutions as well as re-uniting them back to their iwi, hapū and whānau.  
  • Actively developing and maintaining relationships with international institutions.
  • Making contact with other indigenous communities involved in repatriation in order to engage in a two way exchange of information, support and experiences. 
  • Being part of an international repatriation research project  

Amber has a passion for research, especially relating to Māori history and material culture and also has an interest in the wider Pacific.

Amber has a BA Degree in Anthropology and Religious Studies from Victoria University, and a MA in Archaeology from the University of Auckland, and has begun her PhD with Victoria University, which focuses on Māori and Moriori perspectives of repatriation.

 Amber Kiri Aranui
 

Te Arikirangi Mamaku

Kaitohutohu Kōiwi Tangata – Repatriation Programme Coordinator

Te Arikirangi was born and raised in the small Bay of Plentytownship of Te Teko. He has a strong background in Tikanga Māori , Te Reo Mäori, Kapahaka, Mau Räkau, and Waka. 

He is of Ngāti Awa, Tuhoe, Ngāti Makino, Nga Puhi, and Te Arawa descent. 

Te Arikirangi spent 3 years as a dancer for the Kahurangi Māori Dance Company touring North America before returning to Wellington where he worked for a period of time with Māori arts organisation, Toi Māori Aotearoa – Māori Arts New Zealand. 

Before taking on his role with the repatriation programme, Te Arikirangi worked for Shell Oil NZ Ltd as a trainer, a subject matter expert, and customer service professional. He has a strong interest in the visual arts, history, Tikanga Māori, and foreign languages. 

In 2012 Te Arikirangi carried out a 1-year secondment to Te Papa’s Experience Directorate as a Producer. Over the course of this contract Te Arikirangi produced a wide range of events and activities with organisations and groups such as the Royal Society of New Zealand, New Zeland Music Industry Association, Māori Language Commission, MediaDesignSchool, Massey University, Victoria University Wellington, and Royal New Zealand Ballet. His most significant project has been the planning and delivery of the public events programme for Te Papa’s 5-month season of Game Masters the Exhibition.

 Te Arikirangi Mamaku

Iris Du

Kaitūao - Intern

Iris is a student at Taiwan's Taipei National University of Arts where she is studying towards a Masters degree in Museum Studies.  Iris’ internship with Karanga Aotearoa involves researching kōiwi tangata and Toi moko in Asia, specifically Taiwan and China.

Her research work will be part of the subject of an honours thesis exploring the process of repatriating Māori ancestral remains (including a focus on the translation of both English language texts and Māori language concepts into Traditional and Simplified Chinese Characters), along with the history behind the presence of Māori remains in Asia. 

Iris hopes to complete her degree in 2015, expanding on her honours thesis to further explore the artistic, historical, and cultural background to the exhibition and collection of kōiwi tangata and Toi moko in Taiwan and China.

Iris Du

 

PREVIOUS TEAM MEMBERS

 

Heloise Dazard

Kaitūao - Intern

Heloise Dazard is a French student from the Ecole du Louvre. She is completing her Masters degree in Museum studies, focusing on pacific arts during her studies, and especially on Asmat art from West Papua.

Heloise would like to work in a museum that exhibits pacific collections. She is very interested in the different ways artefacts can be shown to be well understood and respected by the visitors. Te Papa’s policy concerning preservation and promotion of local cultures is very dynamic and echoes Heloise’s own preoccupations.

She is undertaking a three-month internship at Te Papa, working with and alongside the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme, Te Paerangi National Services and Matauranga Maori (Maori Collections). This total immersion is a perfect way to learn about various aspects of Te Papa, to understand how it deals with communities and why it is such a special museum. It would certainly be inspiring for her future career.

 

Mona-Pauline Mangakāhia 

Kaitohutohu Kōiwi Tangata  Repatriation Programme Coordinator (May 2012  March 2013)

Mona-Pauline Mangakāhia is of Ngāti Koata, Ngāti Kuia, Ngai Tahu, Ngāti Maru, Ngāti Tamaterā,Ngāti Whanaunga, Ngāti Raukawa, Rangitāne, Ngāti Kahungunu ki Wairarapa, Te Arawa, Ngāti Huarere, Scottish, French, Spanish and Swedish descent. She was raised in the small rural town of Woodville, before her family moved to Palmerston North.

Mona-Pauline has come from Massey University where she is currently completing a Bachelor of Arts in Māori Studies. She is passionate about her cultural heritage and has a strong background in te reo Māori (Māori Language), tikanga Māori (Māori Protocol) and Kapa Haka (Māori Performing Arts).

Before joining the Repatriation Team, Mona-Pauline worked for Healthcare New Zealand as a Payroll Administrator and also annually working with Wakatū Incorporation as a Cultural Wānanga Facilitator.

Mona-Pauline Mangakāhia

Simon Jean 

Kaitūao - Intern (October 2011 - November 2012)

Simon is a student from Ecoles des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and is currently undertaking his PhD in Anthropology specialising in Māori culture and the repatriation of human remains from France. He is carrying out this PhD under the co-supervision of Victoria University in Wellington.  He completed a history degree from the Rouen University in 2008 and a Masters in 2010.

 This is Simon’s second internship with Te Papa.  His first internship was for a three month period in 2009, where Simon helped to build a better understanding of Te Papa’s repatriation programme by translating repatriation materials into French which provided key educational information for museums and institutions in France to better understand the programmes aims, goals and outcomes.  He was also present in Rouen during discussions to repatriate the Toi moko from the Rouen Museum, leading up to the first repatriation of Mäori human remains from France in May 2011.

For the period of this current internship Simon is continuing to build relationships between Te Papa and French institutions through highlighting current scientific research undertaken by the French pertaining to Toi moko, as well as pursuing his PhD studies with a focus on better understanding the cultural values associated with Toi moko and tä moko, and their continued connection with their communities of origin.  Simon also has a passion to increase his knowledge and understanding of te reo and tikanga Mäori  

Simon is pleased to indicate he is a recent recipient of the France New Zealand Friendship Fund which supports activities and initiatives to bring a greater understanding between the two countries.

Simon Jean

Louisa Joblin

Kaitūao - Intern (December 2011 - August 2012)

Louisa Joblin is a student at Victoria University of Wellington, where she has completed a BA in History of Art, Italian Language, and European Studies. 
In 2012 she will complete honours in Italian and History of Art, along with an LLB.  Louisa’s part-time internship with the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme involves researching köiwi tangata and Toi moko in Italy.

This research work will be the subject of Louisa’s honours thesis, exploring the process of repatriating köiwi tangata from Italy (including a focus on the translation of both English language texts and Māori language concepts into Italian), along with the history behind the presence of Māori remains in Italy. 

Louisa hopes to complete a Masters of Art in 2013, expanding on her honours thesis to further explore the artistic historical and cultural background to the exhibiting and collection of kōiwi tangata and Toi moko in Italy.

Louisa Joblin

Coralie O'hara

Kaitūao - Intern (May - December 2011)

Coralie O’Hara is a student at the University of Victoria Wellington, where she is doing her Master of Museum and Heritage Studies.  As part of her course, she is doing an internship with the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme part-time until the end of 2011. During this internship she is focusing on researching the trade of koiwi tangata and international policies on the repatriation of human remains.

Originally from Auckland, Coralie completed her BA (Hons) in anthropology with First Class Honours at the University of Auckland. It was during this degree that she became interested in repatriation because it combines ethics with social and biological anthropology in a specific museum context. The process of repatriation in New Zealand will be the subject of her Master’s dissertation.

 Coralie O'hara

Sarah Fruendt

Kaitūao - Intern (April - July 2011)

Sarah is a German graduate student of the University of Bonn where she received her Master’s degree in Social Anthropology, Criminal Law and Comparative Literature in February 2011.

During an internship with the Uebersee-Museum in Bremen, Germany, she came across the controversial topic of human remains in museum collections. As a consequence she wrote her final thesis on human remains in Bremen focussing on their provenance and identification but also on their possible future in light of international repatriation movements. To learn more about Mäori and the New Zealand perspective as well as the practical aspects of repatriation she is now doing an internship with Karanga Aotearoa.

In the future she would like to write her PhD on a related topic and help to influence the German museum world towards a more general awareness of other perspectives and the concepts, ideas and wishes that the source communities of their collections might have about the handling of objects and museum representations in general. 

Sarah Fruendt

Ruben van Mansum

Kaitūao - Intern (April - June 2011)

Ruben van Mansum is a Dutch-born New Zealander, completing an 8-week internship with the Karanga Aoteoroa Repatriation Programme and Te Papa's Art CuratorialCollection Team as part of his Post Graduate Diploma in Curatorship at the University of Canterbury.

He grew up in Nelson and attained a B.A. at the University of Canterbury in 2006. He then spent two years teaching English in Japan on the JET Programme before going to the University of Leiden (The Netherlands) for an M.A in Art History, specialising in early Taishō-era (1912-1926) Western-style Japanese oil painting.

Through his study of Japanese art and culture, Ruben is particularly interested in the field of World Art Theory, of decentralising the Western bias in art history and the implications of this in constructing a cultural identity. Through working in the Repatriation Programme he hopes to gain a deeper understanding of how identity can be shaped by cultural objects from a ori perspective.

Ruben van Mansum

Nicola Kiri Smith

Pou Rangahau Rautaki Kōiwi  Repatriation Researcher (October 2008 - March 2011)

Nicola Kiri Smith is of Taranaki, Ngāti Maniapoto, Ngāti Mahuta, Ngāti Toa Rangatira, and Ngāti Pikiao descent. She was raised in Opunake and lived in Hamilton for several years. She moved to Wellington in November 2007. 

Nicola attended the University of Waikato, gaining a Bachelor of Social Sciences (First Class Honours) majoring in sociology and anthropology. Nicola also holds a National Certificate in Māori Culture and New Zealand History, and a National Certificate in Computing. She is a past recipient of a Summer Research Scholarship from the Child Accident Prevention Foundation of New Zealand.

Before joining Te Papa, Nicola worked at the University of Waikato, the Waikato-Maniapoto Māori Land Court, and the Waitangi Tribunal. Her interests include Māori land law, whakapapa (genealogy), Māori history, cultural ownership, and social-science research methodologies. 

Nicola Kiri Smith

Julia Ferloni

Kaitūao - Intern (February - March 2011)

Julia Ferloni is a French curator from INP (French National Institute for Heritage), which trains French curators and conservators. She is qualified in Museum Studies, History, History of Arts (majoring in Pacific Arts) and Social Anthropology. 

Julia undertook a four week internship with the Pacific Cultures Collections’ team, the Mātauranga Māori Collection Team, as well as Karanga Aotearoa.  While at Te Papa she worked on an exhibition of Oceanic (including Mäori) artefacts for Rouen’s Natural History Museum (Normandy, France) with the assistance and guidance of the three Te Papa teams listed above. The museum also possesses an ancient collection of Pasifika and Māori objects, with some collected as early as 1839.

 Rouen’s Natural History Museum will be the first French institution to repatriate a Toi Moko.

Julia Ferloni

Laura Kraak

Kaitūao - Intern (July - August 2010)

Laura Kraak is a Dutch student from University College Utrecht. She is undertaking a Liberal Arts and Science Bachelor programme, with a major in the humanities (museum studies, (art) history) and a minor in anthropology. Next year she intends to do a Masters degree in Cultural Heritage/Museum Studies.

Laura undertook a five-week internship with the Karanga Aotearoa Repatriation Programme. During this internship Laura carried out inventory research relating to correspondence with Dutch museums and institutions, while also reviewing a paper on the trade of toi moko in the Bay of Islands. 

Laura is especially interested in the concept of repatriation in general, whether it is about human remains, artefacts, photographs, or intangible heritage. The ways source communities deal with repatriation, and the different views on repatriation between European and settler societies, will be the topic of her Bachelor thesis.

Laura Kraak

Alice Christophe

Kaitūao - Intern (July - August 2010)

Alice Christophe is a French student from the École du Louvre where she is studying History of Arts, majoring in Pacific Arts. She completed her diploma at the École du Louvre, and is starting her Masters of Museology in September 2010, with specific reference to the history of collections and cultural management policies.

Alice undertook a six-week internship at Te Papa, with a focus on its bicultural policy. She is particularly interested in Pacific Arts and Te Papa’s innovative bicultural approaches and models, and is comparing these with European models.  She hopes that exchanges and discussions between museums around the world will help to develop a new type of museum, one which respects all peoples and incorporates communities’ voices.

Alice Christophe