Getting Down to Earth Debates: The Kermadecs and our role as kaitiaki (guardians) 

When:
Thursday 10 January 2013,  6pm–7pm
Where:
The Marae, Level 4
Cost:
Free entry
Type:
 

The carefully managed use of our environment is key to New Zealanders’ role as kaitiaki – and part of the nation’s self concept. The management of marine resources and habitats is a great challenge for New Zealand. With the fourth largest Exclusive Economic Zone in the world, decisions made in our corner of the Pacific can have a global influence.

Te Papa is inviting audiences to hear some of the foremost thinkers in their fields discuss key environment issues. They will share their values, perceptions, and vision of a wisely managed natural environment. Our debate will use the example of marine resources around the Kermadec Islands in order to develop our thinking on protecting and using maritime zones.

 

 

Bronwen Golder 

Bronwen Golder, Director, Global Ocean Legacy (GOL) NZ for Pew Environment Group

Bronwen runs the GOL NZ campaign, which focuses on securing full marine protection for the Kermadec area. She also advises and supports the GOL team in Chile, who are working to secure similar protection for the waters around Easter Island.

Having started her career as a corporate banker in New York, Bronwen spent a number of years working for the NZ Department of Labour Community Employment Group. She was then seconded to assist the Minister of Employment and later worked in the Business Developments Office as a Policy Advisor.

For the past twenty years Bronwen has worked in conservation – first for WWF International and more recently for Pew as the Kermadec Initiative Director. Her focus has been on large-scale conservation planning, the conservation/development interface, and public/private sector partnerships.

 

Dr Mike Patrick 

Dr Mike Patrick, Director, MERMAN Ltd, environmental and risk management consultancy

Mike has extensive experience in the marine sector. He has managed the national marine oil spill contingency plan and consulted for the offshore petroleum exploration and seabed mining sectors. He has contributed to New Zealand’s Ross Sea State of the Environment Report; government led forums to protect marine areas in the West Coast and Sub-Antarctic regions; and codes of practice in relation to marine mammals and geologists’ use of seismic testing.

 

Kennedy Warne 

Kennedy Warne, writer, editor, and photographer

Kennedy Warne co-founded New Zealand Geographic in 1988 and served as the magazine’s editor for 15 years. He relinquished the editorship in 2004 to become a freelance writer. His work has appeared in National Geographic, Smithsonian, Canadian Geographic and GEO. He was named Canon Magazine Feature Writer of the Year in 2012. Much of his writing for National Geographic has focused on marine themes, a field that draws on his academic background (MSc in marine zoology from the University of Auckland). His article on the world’s disappearing mangrove forests, published by National Geographic in 2007, subsequently became a book, Let Them Eat Shrimp: The Tragic Disappearance of the Rainforests of the Sea. His most recent feature for New Zealand Geographic is entitled ‘Who are Tūhoe, and what do they want?’, published in the Christmas 2012 edition.

 

Susan Waugh 

Chair: Dr Susan Waugh, Senior Curator Natural Environment, Te Papa

Susan has led the Science Programme at Te Papa for the past 2 years. She heads a team of ten researchers who study New Zealand biodiversity and taxonomy. Her previous experience is as an advisor on protected species’ interactions with fisheries in New Zealand and internationally. She is trained as a seabird ecologist, completing a PhD on albatross biology in 1999, and has conducted several subsequent studies on petrels and shearwaters, as well as developing the field of Ecological Risk Assessment for seabirds in New Zealand and across the Pacific region. Susan has chaired a number of forums on marine species protection and mitigation of environmental risk for government and international technical groups.