Art After Dark Toi o te Pō – Colour, Rhythm, and Jazz 

When:
Thursday 17 September 2009,  5.30pm–8.30pm
Where:
Throughout Te Papa
Cost:
Free entry
Type:
 

Speed circa 1922, Flight, Claude (1881–1955), London. Gift of Rex Nan Kivell, 1953. Te Papa
Speed circa 1922, Flight, Claude (1881–1955), London. Gift of Rex Nan Kivell, 1953. Te Papa

5.30pm–6.15pm 
Dynamism and Colour: British linocuts of the 1930s

Join Victoria Robson, Curator of European Art, for this scintillating floortalk.
The Ilott Room, Level 4.

6.30pm–7.15pm 
Colour, Rhythm, and Line: The legacy of the British Linocut Movement in the prints of Eileen Mayo

Learn about British-born artist and designer Eileen Mayo with guest speaker Jillian Cassidy.

7.30–8.15pm
Stellar

The jazz ensemble Stellar, made up of students from the New Zealand School of Music, play in Level 4 Espresso.

Stellar are:
Penelope Kibby (vocals)
Scott Maynard (bass)
Kate Fausett (piano)
Mike Crawford (saxophone)
Callum Goldie (drums)

Visit Callum Goldie’s MySpace page. 
Visit Kate Fausett’s MySpace page.

Find out more about the Dynamism and Colour exhibition.

Artist Eileen Mayo

Eileen Mayo exhibited her first colour linocut, Turkish Bath, in the Second Exhibition of British Linocuts at the Redfern Gallery, London, in 1930. The Observer singled out Turkish Bath as 'the most satisfactory print in the show' and commented on its rhythmic flow, dynamic pattern, and colour.

This illustrated talk demonstrates how the characteristics of the British Linocut Movement persisted throughout Eileen Mayo's career as a printmaker.

Guest speaker Dr Jillian Cassidy

Dr Jillian Cassidy graduated with a Diploma in Fine Arts (printmaking) from the University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts in 1975. She gained an MA in medieval art from the Courtauld Institute, University of London. She did a PhD thesis on the British-born artist and designer Eileen Mayo.

From 1985 to 2008, Jillian lectured on classical art, medieval art, and contemporary prints in the Department of Art History and Theory, University of Canterbury. She now works as a freelance art historian and art editor.